The tatami in Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsugi (53 stages of Tokaido Road) Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsuginouchi, Mariko, and Meibutsu-Chamise (Noted Tea House) / Hiroshige UTAGAWA

2018.11.11

The tatami in Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsugi (53 stages of Tokaido Road) Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsuginouchi, Mariko, and Meibutsu-Chamise (Noted Tea House) / Hiroshige UTAGAWA

The tatami in Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsugi (53 stages of Tokaido Road) Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsuginouchi, Mariko, and Meibutsu-Chamise (Noted Tea House) / Hiroshige UTAGAWA

The tatami in Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsugi (53 stages of Tokaido Road) Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsuginouchi, Mariko, and Meibutsu-Chamise (Noted Tea House) / Hiroshige UTAGAWA

The tatami in Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsugi (53 stages of Tokaido Road) Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsuginouchi, Mariko, and Meibutsu-Chamise (Noted Tea House) / Hiroshige UTAGAWA

Ukiyo-e Painting was popular in Japan at the end of the Edo Period, and it was drawn by Japanese traditional way.
Ukiyo-e Painting was expanded to Europe, and it influenced well to painters at that time.

For example, Claude Monet’s “Haystacks” was given hints to its composition and gradations from Hiroshige UTAGAWA’s Tokaido-Gojusan-Tsuginouchi, Mariko, and Meibutsu-Chamise.

Tokaido Road had been maintained since the late 7th century, and it connects from Tokyo to Kyoto.
In the Edo Period, it was officially given a name of Tokaido Road.

Still now, it has worked as the 1st national road.
Furthermore, a lot of cars, people, are luggages is passing because of Shinkansen and the highway there.

In the Edo Period, the trip was done in a walk or horses, so there are post towns in 53 places.
This picture is a one among the series that draw each view.

Mariko is a post town in Yaizu, Shizuoka Prefecture, and there is a popular food “Tororo-Jiru (yam soup)”.
At the center of the picture, there is a tea house with a signboard written “Noted Tororo-Jiru”, and travelers eat “Tororo-Jiru”.

In the tea house, we can see the tatami floored space.
We can guess that people who want to relax, eat in the tatami floored room to take a rest.

“Tororo-Jiru” is made from grating Japanese yam.
Japanese yam is made in Japan, and it grows under the ground.

It is good for the nourishing tonic, so it has been eaten as the uplifting medicine since long time ago.
The cultivated Japanese yam has been going on, but the wild Japanese yam has the high nutritive value and tastes rich.

Amazingly, this tea house “Choujiya” is still there.
Choujiya was opened in 1596, that was before the Edo Period, and it offered local Tororo-Jiru to travelers.

In Choujiya, it mixes up the Katsuodashi (bonito stock) with miso, eggs, and the grating Japanese yam, and then, they are put on boiled barley and rice.

Why don’t you eat “Tororo-Jiru” in the world of Ukiyo-e Paining, that loved by Monet?

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【Photos】https://www.chojiya.info/

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